Filed In: Process

Father/Daughter Project - Part 16

February 03, 2020   |   Chris Blandford

Getting closer.


21. Cable Routing



Now that I have the rear brake mounted, I can determine how I want to run its cable. I begin by installing some handlebars, and cutting a piece of housing. I hold the housing up to the frame, play with it until I’m satisfied with the run, and make marks with a Sharpie. For this bike, I decided to run the cable internally, in full-length housing. It will run from the bars, around the non-drive side of the head tube, and into the underside of the drive-side top tube. It will make its tube-exit in a spot that I hope minimizes how far out the v-brake noodle will protrude.

I understand that most (proper?) internally-run cable housing runs through a brazed-in brass or stainless tube (and is done up front, before any tubes are connected together). I decided here, however, to merely braze on a little reinforcement plate and drill an angled hole for the cable. (This is similar to how I’ve internally-routed lighting wire in the past.) I’ll probably do something different on the Father bike--we’ll see.

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Father/Daughter Project - Part 15

January 31, 2020   |   Chris Blandford

All right, BRAKES!



20. BRAKES!


I’ve decided to go ahead and put hand brakes on this bike, as originally planned. I went back and forth a bit, but I think this is the right decision. I can always add a coaster brake if need be; it’d be tougher to go the other direction.

Brake bosses, I’ve found, are straightforward. Here I’m using a Paul brake (see Nerd Note A). For any Paul rim brake, I’ve used the simple, spring-hole-less Paragon bosses. To get them located, I install them onto the brake arm itself, insert a wheel into the frame (see Nerd Note B), and place them on the frame/fork. I mark the location with a Sharpie and that’s that. I usually check my placement against the recommended distance-from-axle spec, but--imagine that--the spec for brake stud distance for a 305 BSD rim isn’t listed in any of the obvious places.

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Father/Daughter Project - Part 14

January 29, 2020   |   Chris Blandford

Finishing the fork:


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3. Rake blades
4. Tab dropouts; slot fork blades
5. Braze dropouts to blades
6. Finish blade ends
7. Braze blades to crown
9. Finish crown
10. Machine race seat


Time to get the fork blades ready. For this bike, I decided to use a pair of oval chainstays as fork blades. The oval of the chainstays wasn’t the same as the crown’s sockets, however, so I had to nudge the oval-ends of the chainstays in my vise. I also used pliers and a small tack hammer to umm… smith?... the crown a bit. It was a tad loose in spots; a few taps and nudges here and there got everything fitting nicely. Again, going for that snug slip fit, just like the steerer/crown.

 

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